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An insight into Mexico’s Day of the Dead unique celebration


If you’re ever wondering the streets of Mexico from November 1st to 2nd, then you’re bound to encounter various eerie decorations all throughout the local towns of Mexico, especially if you happen to pass by a graveyard. 

You’ll soon come to find out that the Day of the Dead (known as Día de Muertos in Spanish) is one of the most renowned holidays in Mexico. During this time, Mexicans commemorate their departed loved ones through various forms, most of which have been part of Mexico’s traditions for centuries. 

Cultural beliefs behind the Day of the Dead

The philosophy following the Day of the Dead is that fallen spirits of each family member return to be with families for this special day. Both adults and children play an important role during this holiday as it is said that November 1st the spirits of the infants and children arrive followed by adults soon to follow the day after to share the special moments once lived alongside their loved ones.

Although most foreigners would believe it to be a saddening or unusual event, it’s rather the contrary. A holiday rich in vibrant colors that honor family members who have passed on to a distinct world is nothing short of extraordinary. 

Mexicans spend this time in cemeteries, decorating the graves of their loved ones and simply spend quality time as they reminisce of all the joyous moments that were shared, joined by friends and family. 

Here you will also encounter decorated altars (called ofrendas) in their homes each with a similar base of flowers but creatively decorated with food, tools and other gadgets belonging to their passed loved ones.  

This holiday has marked such importance in Mexico’s culture that has shaped its identity with every unique aspect.

Click here for more information about this legendary celebration.